NICABM

Week 128: Understanding the Body’s Role in Causing and Relieving Triggers

November 12 – November 17, 2018

November 19 – November 24, 2018 . . . . .

WEEK 128

November 19 – November 24, 2018


 

Monday, November 19, 2018



One Crucial Starting Point for Working with Emotional Triggers

Dan Siegel, MD, shares a key first step in helping a client move beyond an emotional trigger
Running time: 11:48

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Tuesday, November 20, 2018



Helping Clients Map Emotional “Glimmers” in the Body

Deb Dana, LCSW, gets into a strategy for helping clients get more in touch with their body’s natural, automatic responses.
Running time: 07:30

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Wednesday, November 21, 2018



When an Emotional Trigger Leads to Shutdown

Bill O’Hanlon, LMFT, shares a creative approach for helping clients ground themselves when they disconnect or dissociate during a session.
Running time: 10:01

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Thursday, November 22, 2018



How to Nudge Clients Away from Over-Analyzing Their Emotional

Christine Padesky, PhD looks at a strategy for helping clients come out of their heads and back into their bodies when triggered.unning time: 11:28

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Friday, November 23, 2018



Critical Insights

Kelly McGonigal, PhD and Ron Siegel, PsyD highlight the key concepts in this week’s videos.
Running time: 25:51

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Saturday, November 24, 2018



Focus on Application

Rick Hanson, PhD and Joan Borysenko, PhD, connect exercises and techniques with this week’s discussion so you can begin using these ideas right away with your clients.
Running time: 22:05

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Leave a Comment

4 Responses

  1. Not sure how to get support for a client as I used search for help and nothing I put in goes through. I have a wonderful young lady who lost a baby after birth of the infant the first week and now suffers from preeclampsia and nothing medical field has done has been helpful. Does anyone have any ideas how working with her nervous system could be affective. Supervisers are still somewhat in the dark ages and none offer help.

    I have used Rosenberg’s exercise to help open the system. She does it when she remembers,but not sure she follows through regularly. Also did Dana’s imagery exercises regarding the polyvagal nerves. Meditation I encouraged her to begin again, even though the ruminations regarding the death of her child might cause discomfort. She will resume as stopping it after the death did not seem to matter. She reads and journals relisiously and loves the books given to her on her particular healing and they seem to help.

    I think she has a good handle on the loss cognitively, fully supported by those around her and the spouse, also in counseling. I am hoping there might be an answer with all you specialists if you have ever encountered this particular complication.

    All the research I have done has been done by the physicians. Blood pressure meds puts her back in the hospital but she has to take it. There is a history of nausea from early childhood, and major surgeries for her hips at quite a young age.

    She has been very responsible raising herself over the years, quite intelligent and independent. She has done a lot of work on her healing from this tragedy, but the body is fighting her improvement as she tries to move on in her daily life, The docs have made it worse in their hope to medically help her heal, but the danger still persists.

    Did not know how to ask this question to the group so went to a web site as I cannot get a place in the support section as it does not open up a connection. Tried to email from there, but frankly, I would love to hear from all you colleagues about any offerings you might have from a mental health position.

  2. it was helpful to listen to dr Dan Siegel’s presentation. i had been starting to use his wheel of awareness and it is a good practical way to teach mindfulness and uncover triggers and their emotional connections. i learned further insights about this connectivity and to help the client nurture themselves with their healthy adult mind.
    Deb Dana’s work was very novel to me in learning about her application o polyvagal theory in this manner for couples counseling. am considering adding this to my work with couples as it seems useful for reducing reactivity in variety of relationship situations, particularly when they are motivated.

  3. it was helpful to listen to dr Dan Siegel’s presentation. i had been starting to use his wheel of awareness and it is a good practical way to teach mindfulness and uncover triggers and their emotional connections. i learned further insights about this connectivity and to help the client nurture themselves with their healthy adult mind.