NICABM

WEEK 115: Fear in the Brain and Body

August 06 – August 11, 2018 . . . . .

WEEK 115

August 06 – August 11, 2018


 

Monday, August 06, 2018



How the Brain Responds to Excessive or Recurrent Fear

Robert Hedaya, MD explores four biological sources of fear . . . and how to help clients understand them.
Running time: 06:11

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Tuesday, August 07, 2018



How to Avoid Triggering a Client’s Fear

Bessel van der Kolk, MD shares one healing strategy that may actually be triggering for someone who has experienced trauma.
Running time: 07:11

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Wednesday, August 08, 2018



How to Work with the Brain and the Body to Relieve Fear

Dan Siegel, MD explores the physiological pathway of emotion . . . and why that matters when it comes to alleviating fear.
Running time: 11:10

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Thursday, August 09, 2018



How to Work with Fear That Feels Irrational

Dan Siegel, MD shares a story of how he helped a client process a long-forgotten memory that was fueling her fear.
Running time: 09:46

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Friday, August 10, 2018



Critical Insights

Ron Siegel, PsyD and Kelly McGonigal, PhD highlight the key concepts in this week’s videos.
Running time: 21:22

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Saturday, August 11, 2018



Focus on Application

Joan Borysenko, PhD, and Rick Hanson, PhD connect exercises and techniques with this week’s discussion so you can begin using these ideas right away with your clients.
Running time: 18:56

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Leave a Comment

10 Responses

  1. Again so useful for me, my las client this mornng is struggling wth overwhelming emotinal reations. She cries without warning or understanding. We discussed all aspects of her tears until we talked about the possiblity of anger and resentment as being the feelings that overwhelm her. I used the word Fear and she jumped and stated, exactly. She informed me that she is fearful of rejection if she stops puting everyone else first. It is her role and we are just stating to explore how this became her reality. She is afraid that if she respects her own boundaries she will no longer be herelf. Fear of survival, thanks again sue C

  2. I appreciate and use most all of the information shared in this weeks speakers. One last item, I really like Doc Hanson’s share about how a “nice guy” can be seen as scary. I just never thought of it that way.

  3. I, too, was struck with how rich this week’s discussions were. What has been particularly poignant for me has been that even though presenters come from sometimes markedly different theoretical perspectives there are huge overlaps in terms of how they recommend approaching clients. Ron dentified one particularly important way, which involves, in my words, focusing on process and what is going on in the therapeutic relationship. I also appreciated Kelly naming fear of fear (again my words) as being important.
    I was particularly struck by Dan’s case example, in which his invitation to a client to focus on her bodily experience led to a early childhood memory. His client developed profound insight into the impact falling off of a tricycle had on the course of her life. It was a beautiful illustration of how incorporation of bodily experience in psychotherapy opens pathways that might otherwise never be accessed.

  4. I work with clients whom have varying levels of fear, and fear is fear! This week is full of insights into how different fear feels to clients. Some are able to keep moving although the fear is blocking feelings, while some are immobilized by fear and feelings are so intense they are not able to move forward. Finding the effective approach for clients is difficult and listening to these experts is helpful.

  5. Wonderful insights from all!! Saving the last two days for my late week need for motivation. There was so much here, it is hard to pinpoint the impact for this week’s client work, but I am excited to have this set in my nervous system, heart and mind as I enter sessions next week.

    Our evolution is aweinspiring. Need to go back to Damascio in my library. Dainiel’s synopsis is grounding for my work with clients. All his books have been helful as have all of Bessel van der Kolk.

    Daniel Siegel’s story of his client brought all sorts of memories long repressed just for me personally to challenge client and the professional mindsets.

    Love the approaches of each of the speakers from different perspective as I believe we are evolving even now. These approaches will affect our evolution. It is easy to see in the client responses from all these “layers of complexity.” They seem to crave this kind of understanding. No longer living a “life of mediocrity.” All from Daniel Siegel’s quotes.

    Thanks for a great webinar. I am excited to read the last two days consolidation of other great panel thinkers.

    1. I, too, was struck with how rich this week’s discussions were. What has been particularly poignant for me has been that even though presenters come from sometimes markedly different theoretical perspectives there are huge overlaps in terms of how they recommend approaching clients. Ron dentified one particularly important way, which involves, in my words, focusing on process and what is going on in the therapeutic relationship. I also appreciated Kelly naming fear of fear (again my words) as being important.
      I was particularly struck by Dan’s case example, in which his invitation to a client to focus on her bodily experience led to a early childhood memory. His client developed profound insight into the impact falling off of a tricycle had on the course of her life. It was a beautiful illustration of how incorporation of bodily experience in psychotherapy opens pathways that might otherwise never be accessed.

      1. It is nice to see collaboration again. It seems to have been lost in the profession and nice to have a group of clinicians or specialists speaking together to share ideas and strategies. This is the way it should be.

        The best workshop of the many we take in this profession was at the Biology of Music Making in Denver, Colorado, where a group of many experts from all walks of life convened for a week that stays in my memory for years following. This is what helps motivate me and thus, my clients.